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Issue 1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 Package (Issue 02 sold out)

€75.00 €65.00

Buy Issue 01, Issue 03, Issue 04, Issue 05, and Issue 06 together. Issue 02 is sold out.
More reading is more fun.

Issue 1

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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * To celebrate two years of wonderful encounters, a lot of walking and many amazing collaborations we are returning to the street where it all started: Berlin, Kantstrasse. The celebration couldn't be complete without our previously sold out Issue 01 which is returning to the printers! So for those who didn't manage to grab a copy the first time round, you can place your pre-orders now. New feature: inserted booklet with selected texts in German. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

CONTRIBUTORS: MAXIME BALLESTEROS / ROMAN BARTON / FREDERICK CANTA-PAN / HANNES CASPAR / SVEN EGGERS / JAN OLE GERSTER / SARAH ILLENBERGER / ALEXANDRA KLOBOUK / MANZINE / MALAKOFF KOWALSKI / IRIS NEUMANN / MALTE SEIDEL / PAUL SULLIVAN / LISA WAMELING / HELLA WENDERS

The first issue depicts Kantstraße, Berlin. Chosen by the publisher because of her personal connection to the street the issue was about taking well-known information or things taken for granted and inspecting them from a different angle. Though it being the first issue the reoccuring pillars of Flaneur magazine like shop and home visits, »Traces of Resistance« and the observatory fragments already hold this magazine together.

Writer Roman Barton takes a closer look at Kantstraße's reputation as being Berlin's modest China Town by eating his way through the famous restaurants and recording his reactions in a literary menu-like format illustrated by Alexandra Klobouk. Architects Lisa Wameling and Sven Eggers analyse the history and future of the Kantgaragen in a fictional dialogue. The piece includes a visual future for the giant of a building by Lisa Wameling. Film directors Hella Wenders and Jan-Ole Gerster go on photographic trips using a disposable camera each. Berlin-based photographer Maxime Ballesteros spends a night in the bar of lost souls »Goldener Löffel« and manages to capture raw moments. Composer Malakoff Kowalski composes a soundtrack to the street that is visualized by Flaneur's design team and cover girl Iris Neumann shares a story written from the point of view of her Charlottenburger cats.

And there's much more: Manzine stages an intervention on the street's central reservation strip, designer Sarah Illenberger recreates the street with objects and writer Paul Sullivan looks back at historic flaneurs.

The magazine consists of a 120 pages featuring a gatefold cover.

In stock

Issue 3

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CONTRIBUTORS: MICHEL DE BROIN / MEREDITH ERICKSON / MIVIL DESCHÊNES / TIM GEORGESON / FRÉDÉRICK GRAVEL / CAIA HAGEL / CYNTHIA IMOGEN HAMMOND / DAVID HOMEL / TIMOTHY PALMA / SARA A.TREMBLAY / JEAN-SÉBASTIEN LAROUCHE / MATHIEU LEROUX / CHRISTIAN LETTOW / RICHMOND LAM / STEPHANE NAJMAN / JOSIP NOVAKOVICH / ROBERT ALEXANDER QUINN / JONATHAN VILLENEUVE / AMANDA VINCELLI / ANDREW ZADEL / MARIE-ANGE ZIBI

The third, and first international issue, depicts Rue Bernard in Montreal, Canada. Though created in mostly snowy and freezing weather conditions the issue is a vibrant, vivacious and dynamic hybrid of stories and people mirroring the clashes of identities that is Canada.

For the reoccurring »Photographic Trips« sculptors Michel de Broin and Jonathan Villeneuve capture Rue Bernard through their eyes using a disposable camera each. With a collection of essays depicting Canada as a land of fragmented identities the writers David Homel, Josip Novakovich, Jean-Sébastien Larouche and Andrew Zadel beautifully reinforce Flaneur's concept of being a literary magazine. Montreal choreographer and dancer Frédérick Gravel stages an intervention on the street with a group of dancers playing not only with the street's void but with the meaning of dance in a static format. Writer Caia Hagel and editor Grashina Gabelmann teamed up with illustrator Mivil Deschênes to pay homage to Rue Bernard's roller derby girls and Montreal's love to graphic novels with the comic »The Rolling Supernovas«, which is presented in a comic book format. Writer Tim Woods Palma finds himself on the street in the middle of the night in a peculiar state of mind. He writes snippets of prose, collects things off the street and records conversations he has with others including his mother. This confusion of information and materials is presented cleverly in an experimental format. Photographer Tim Georgeson met and followed two young boys in love against all odds. Their love story and philosophies are recorded by Caia Hagel alongside the images. And there's much more: the shops and homes of the people on Rue Bernard, inner conversations visualized through 3D renderings, a dreamy food shoot and an architectural walk down the street.

The magazine consists of 136 pages (plus a sixteen page comic book and a in lay of fragmented snippets) + a 18 paged booklet with selected texts in French and a gatefold cover.

SEE OUR VOL 1: RUE BERNARD – AUDIO TAPE RECORDINGS HERE * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Save 20% when you buy Issue 3 + Vol 1: Rue Bernard. Just enter the code vol1ruebernard at the checkout. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

In stock

Issue 4

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CONTRIBUTORS: GIUSEPPE AMMENDOLA / FABRIZIO AMOROSO / ROSARIA BASILEO
CECILIA CANZIANI / BERADO CARBONI / FRANCESCO CARERI
CLAUDIO CERASA / ALESSANDRO CICORIA / DAVIDE FRANCESCHINI
MORITZ GAUDLITZ / ARIANNA GIACOMINI / VALERIA GIAMPIETRO
VITTORIO GIAMPIETRO / ILARIA GIANNI / LAC AND ATI / PAOLO DI LUCENTE JIMMY KENNEDY / ANNIKA LARSSON / CHRISTIAN LETTOW / VALERIO MANNUCCI / LORENZO MARSILI / LILLI MESSINA / CRISTINA PAVONE /LUIGI PRESTINENZA PUGLISI / MARCO RAPARELLI / ALESSIO RIGO DE RIGHI ANDREW RUTT / HANNAH SIODA / ALESSANDRO TOTI / CARLO GABRIELE TRIBBIOLI / NASAN TUR / MIKE WATSON / MATTEO ZOPPIS

The street, though unavoidable for Romans and tourists alike, is a street that can easily be dismissed and ignored – it's hectic, fragmented and not beautiful by Roman standards, but it is here that Rome's future was once considered, and the magazine attempts this challenge again.

For the reoccurring »Photographic Trips« Vatican conservators Giuseppe Ammendola and Rosaria Basileo capture Corso Vittorio Emanuele II through their own eyes, each using a disposable camera. New York-based Roman photographer Fabrizio Amoroso performed and witnessed miracles on the street; a watermelon-filled fountain, a ruin turned into a lake and a saint climbing a ladder. Roman artist Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli assembled a geographical archive in which the coordinates are prey, a fish caught in Rome's Tiber. Along every step of the catch, the animal’s transfiguration and preservation were documented. Again, the magazine experiments with film, in and beyond its pages, as Roman filmmakers Matteo Zoppis and Alessio Rigo de Righi are confronted with a mysterious door, the keeper of its keys and parrots. Artist and Villa Massimo resident Annika Larsson displays her recorded sound archive of the street in lists, photographs and notes. The heart of Issue 04 is Questione Romana, an experimental faux panel discussion debating the future of the street and hence of Rome. The panel is formed by eleven individuals ranging from architects and curators to journalists, artists and politicians. Their answers are in the form of edited dialogues, sketches, archival material and guerrilla interventions. Traces of Resistance, a regular series by editor Fabian Saul, is the historical counterpoint to this discussion of the future, taking the reader through different historical epochs and moments of Roman history.

The magazine consists of 152 pages (plus a fold-out leporello) + a 16 paged booklet with selected texts in Italian and a gatefold cover.

Issue 5

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FOLLOWING THE ORAL HISTORY OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD OF KYPSELI, THE MAGAZINE FINDS ITSELF ENTANGLED IN A STORY-HEAVY MICROCOSM. FOKIONOS NEGRI, ONCE A RIVER, NOW A BROAD AND GREEN, TWO-SIDED BOULEVARD BECOMES A STAGE OF OVERLAPPING NARRATIVES WHERE STORIES ARE TOLD AND RE-TOLD. AS ON EVERY STAGE, THE DESIRE FOR THE STORY IS STRONGER THAN THE NEED TO SUBDUE IT TO RIGID LOGIC. THE MAGAZINE EMERSES ITSELF IN THESE FRAGMENTS UNTIL THEY BECOME OUR VERY OWN MEMORY. The entire magazine is held together by three bodies of fragmented text called The Road Up and The Road Down. The collection of stories, poetry, overlapping narratives and numerous characters and voices sets out to be a mythological storyteller – just as a the street itself is. New York-based artist David Whelan took his artist residency on Fokionos Negri as an opportunity to unearth underground resistance in a series of narrative snapshots. Fokionos Negri-based artist Antonakis illustrated his obsessive search for the actor who played the leading role in the infamous 1960s film The Punk of Fokionos Negri. Eirini Vourloumis embarks on a photographic, double-exposed exploration of the street, initiated by a tasseography fortune told to her in the street's Magic Cafe. With a strong literary focus, this issue presents an essay section that consists of four stories: a mythological tale of a boy stuck between two worlds; a Greek, a Bavarian and a broken elevator; a famed opera singer and her Kypseli sanctuary; a 33rd birthday at the centre of the world; a filmmaker’s search for a potential script. Photographer Zoe Hatziyannaki was triggered by Keats’s poem »Ode on a Grecian Urn« to undertake a photographic search for romantic purity. The artist Iris Touliatou mimicked an online medical forum to imagine the effects of olfactory hallucinations, with the street as a producer of phantom smells. The architect and curator Elina Axioti considered the vanished doormen that used to keep the mail and secrets of those living in Athens' modern, multi-home structures, along with photographer Yiannis Hadjiaslanis. Traces of Resistance, a regular series by editor Fabian Saul, is a historical counterpoint to the very story-focused issue, drawing lines between different lives and stories connected through the street and resistance. Another ongoing series, the shop and home visits series presents souvlaki shop Rigani, cafe Foivos and the restaurant Phaedra, and the homes of former jetsetter Poly, artist Antonakis and consultant Mikali. For the reccurring series »Photographic Trips,« two children capture Fokionos Negri through their own eyes, each using a disposable camera.

Issue 06

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Diverging from the principle of focussing on one street, we let ourselves succumb to Moscow’s underlying cosmological blueprint: the city is made up of orbits. The Boulevard Ring is the first orbit and on it we chose five bubbles that encircle the Kremlin. These bubbles are not just places – they are constellations, principles, motifs for our exploration. They are focal points that we can return to, when we get lost, thus they allow us to get lost. Their boundaries are as blurry as their inner centre. But for now, we choose to believe in them – we choose to let them take us. Chapter 1: Arbatskaya Square – Kirill Savchenkov, uses the skateboard as a tool to explore the cityscape as a training zone for future survival techniques. In his essay »Tactical Behaviours« editor-in-chief Fabian Saul turns to the concept of tactical behaviours to decode his meanderings. Chapter 2: Pushkinskaya Square – Author Ksenia Golubovich revives her childhood memories by returning to her former communal home. A team of people collected a wealth of information of those using the Boulevard Ring to paint a vivid picture of the transient life on the Ring. Oxana Rudschenko tells stories of her life on Pushkinskaya Square through the twilight of the Soviet Era. Chapter 3: Chistye Prudy – The photographer Anna Skladmann visits her grandmother’s house in Germany that is full of artifacts of her former life in her native Moscow. Pavel Pepperstein introduces us, with the grace of one who has seen everything, to his home on Chistye Prudy, where he grew up with his father, the artist Viktor Pivovarov. Marinika Sadgyan uses social media content to reconstruct a civilian attempt to save a Constructivist building from being demolished. Photographer Stas Galaktionov explores the underground vibes of one of the last remaining squats in the neighbourhood. Chapter 4: Moskva Waters – Editor-in-chief Grashina Gabelmann uses her watery dreams and a challenging cat to navigate through a psycho-geographical, introverted piece. The artist Judith Sönnicken considers the mental architecture of disappearing and reappearing structures. Her considerations take on the form of a fictional museum and its permanent collection, for which she is a curator and artist. In the piece »Two Hours In«, a bar on Chistoprudny Boulevard provides the setting for a free-wheeling conversation about five-year-olds watching Soviet-era parades on YouTube, Lacan and the question of whether or not you can talk about sex while having it. Chapter 5: Prospects – The last chapter considers the future as much as the possible futures of the past, the crossroads that haven't been taken, through a collection of poems, short stories and visuals.
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